Question: Which Tense Is Used With Have?

What are the 16 tenses in English?

16 Tenses in English Grammar (Formula and Examples)Simple Present Tense.Present Continuous Tense.Present Perfect Tense.Present Perfect Continuous Tense.Simple Past Tense.Past Continuous Tense.Past Perfect Tense.Past Perfect Continuous Tense.More items….

Had been doing VS have been doing?

“Had been doing” is used in past perfect continuous tense. It tells that work/action was started in past and still continued in present. While, “Was doing” is used in past continuous tense which shows that work/action was happening in the past .

Where do we use had in a sentence?

When you need to talk about two things that happened in the past and one event started and finished before the other one started, place “had” before the main verb for the event that happened first. Here are some more examples of when to use “had” in a sentence: “Chloe had walked the dog before he fell asleep.”

Which tense is used with has?

Have or has is used with a past participle to form the present perfect tense. This tense designates action which began in the past but continues into the present, or the effect of the action continues into the present.

What tense we use with for?

The use of FORUses of ForExample sentenceVerb TenseHe has been living in Turin for three months.Present perfect continuousI worked at the service station for five years.Past tenseHe will be in hospital for at least a week.Future tense3 more rows•Feb 8, 2020

Had been Vs have been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

What is the grammar rule for had?

The formula for the past perfect tense is had + [past participle]. It doesn’t matter if the subject is singular or plural; the formula doesn’t change.

Has and have use?

While the verb to have has many different meanings, its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or contain.” Have and has indicate possession in the present tense (describing events that are currently happening). Have is used with the pronouns I, you, we, and they, while has is used with he, she, and it.

Where we use have been?

Usage of “Have Been & Has Been” When we are talking about the present: If the subject of a sentence is I – You – We – They or a plural noun (cars, birds, children) we use ‘have been’. If the subject of the sentence is He – She – It or a singular noun (car, bird, child) we use ‘has been’.

How do you use have had in one sentence?

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”:I’m not feeling well. I have had a headache all day.She has had three children in the past five years.We have had some problems with our computer systems recently.He has had two surgeries on his back.

Has just or had just?

They’re both compound, and they often imply connection between an event and a point of reference. When you say “have just” it implies that the event in reference affects the present state. “Had just” works in much the same way, but because the past is somewhat broad, it can cover a large, more convoluted period.

What are these called in English?

There are 14 punctuation marks that are commonly used in English grammar. They are the period, question mark, exclamation point, comma, semicolon, colon, dash, hyphen, parentheses, brackets, braces, apostrophe, quotation marks, and ellipsis.

How use since in a sentence?

Since sentence examplesSince you arrived, she is not sure this is the way. … “It’s a long time since we met,” he said. … He’d been in a grumpy mood since he got up. … Since then he had treated her with total respect. … I haven’t even seen him since the funeral. … Since they were all dressed up, she assumed they were going to church together.More items…

What is the meaning of had been?

Had it been is an inverted (had it instead of it had) condition clause displaying the subjunctive mood for past counterfactual conditions. It is interchangeable with the non-inverted if-clause if it had been. You can use it like this: Had it been snowing, I would have stayed home. ( but it wasn’t snowing)